Sunday, January 31, 2010

It is a wonderful thing to have experience.

It can be a horrible thing, gaining that experience.

The cute picture of the cat is for those who come to me by the 'Blogger Follower' route - didn't want you to see the following pictures in your reader this morning.

WARNING - possibly disturbing pictures to follow.

Tamari, my favorite goat, lost her babies this morning. When we got out there, she'd just given birth and there they were, all lined up in a row, still warm from her body but with no warmth of their own. Stillborn, never even breathed. They're nearly full-size, but still two weeks away from being developed enough to survive.

Well, the biggest two were two weeks away. The smallest one died awhile ago. About 3 weeks ago, Tamari went from a healthy looking doe to ... not so much. There are no vets around here who know *anything* about goats, but I asked anyway. No, they didn't know what could be going wrong. A slightly elevated temperature, her stomach didn't look right, she was hanging away from the other goats, and her hair got dry and brittle. I did what I could with grain and oil and babied her. Yesterday she was hanging by herself even more, but was still two weeks away from her due date.

This morning, there they were. It appears that one of the babies died three weeks ago (my husband things it was a week longer than that) and her body held onto it, trying to get the other two to term. It couldn't do it, so it voided all of them. The littlest one was so small - and it had long ears.

One of the big ones also had long ears. My buck (who is Tiffany's grandson - so maybe 1/8 or 1/16 Nubian) is obviously carrying that gene.

So I gave her a bucket of warm water and molasses and milked her out. My husband says that it will help her contract her uterus faster, which makes sense. My husband also says that I couldn't have saved them even if I'd been there. He says that it takes a long time to learn that sometimes there's just nothing you can do. He says that even after having learned that, it still sucks when it happens.

He has experience, I'm gaining it. I'll be glad to have it, I hate getting it.

16 comments:

debbiedas said...

Wow. I don't even know what to say. I'm sorry for your loss. I imagine it has to be really hard losing animals like that. Thank you for sharing your experience. Your sentiments are so true...gaining experience sure can be hard. Love and light to you.

Ghislaine said...

I have never commented on your blog and am a fairly new reader, but I just had to come out and say how sorry I am. That must have been an awful sight and a terrible feeling. Hope your kids are dealing with it okay if they know. And I hope Tamari recovers quickly.

Maria said...

Oh my goodness! I'm crying for you. I can't believe it.

Garden Pheenix said...

:c( That's a right bummer. What a sad way to wake up. Hope the mum is ok.

<3

Bovey Belle said...

Perhaps it is for the best as if her body had tried hanging on to them any longer, she would have died along with them. I hope she is soon over her loss (you too).

Goodwife said...

I'm so sorry! It's a hard thing raising livestock sometimes. It takes fortitude and a strong stomach. I hope that you can get your doe brought back to good health and I'm glad that you didn't lose her. Thanks for sharing this with us. My goats are due to start kidding the end of February and it's always a worry. Once again, you have my sympathy.

Darroch Cottage said...

that is just so sad. Poor Tamari. Is she looking for her babies?
So sorry. xx

dreamer said...

So sorry about the little kids,poor babies.I hope Tamari soon regains her health.

Christy said...

I'm so sorry! How upsetting. One of mine is pregnant, I sure hope it all goes well.

Sue, Joe and Michael Webber said...

Is there any chance they could have contracted toxoplasmosis? I have some goats do that one season, it was really bizarre. Once contracted though they are them immune so it shouldn't happen again. Other possiblities clostridial(sp) through not vaccinating, or mineral deficiency, in particular copper which low levels can can abortions.
Sorry about the babies :(

Lindy said...

How sad to lose the babies. I hope you can discover what happened.

Conny said...

I know next to nothing about goats, but that's a hard one to take. I'm sorry it didn't work out.

Throwback at Trapper Creek said...

This is the hard part - we watched my heifer Jetta (the Hun) deliver and photographed the whole thing from a short distance. Imagine our surprise to see that the calf was stillborn.

You never do get over the pain - but you can deal with it better the second time. He's right sometimes it can't be helped. Still sad just the same.

If you're into homeopathics, give her Caulophyllum for her uterus, and Pulsatilla if she shows any sign of an opaque or creamy discharge. Caul is good before birth too, to get the uterus in shape, both remedies are always good to have on hand.

So sorry :(

Farmgirl_dk: said...

The poor little babies...the poor momma...and poor you! I'm so sorry, Sarah. :-(

Annette said...

Well spoken. I am sad for your's and the momma goat's loss. I am assuming that animals recover emotionally faster than humans when it comes to this type of loss?

Michelle | Bleeding Espresso said...

I'm so sorry for your and Tamari's loss :(

My three does are pregnant for the first time, and I'm such a worry wart over things like this...as you said, though, it's experience no matter what happens; we really have so little control over this natural process.

Goat cuddles from southern Italy xxx